The 3 P’s of Medi-Spa safety

The idea and a lot of the content of this blog comes directly from the ASPS website blog but it is really informative and so I thought I would copy it and add some additional thoughts. MediSpa treatments are a group of minimally invasive things that usually involve an injection. What we are talking about here are things like Dysport, Botox, Juvederm, Restylane, Perlane, Sculptra, Radiesse, chemical peels and lighter laser/IPL treatments. So what are the 3 P’s? Product, Place, and Practitioner.

Product: Know what product your MediSpa is using. If you haven’t heard of a particular product or heard of it being used in the manner being proposed ask some questions. A great example of this is the Botox and Dysport debate. Botox is used to smooth wrinkles around the eyes and forehead. It is the market leader and everyone knows it by name. Well, Dysport is effectively the same product. But, it is produced by a British company and doesn’t have the same name recognition. So here is an example of something you might not have heard of that is perfectly acceptable. The other end of the spectrum would be something like liquid silicone injections. These are bad. These are the plastic surgery horror stories that you can google. Research your products! Know what is being injected. If it isn’t FDA approved to be injected say “NO!”.

Place: I’ll be the first to admit I have injected close friends with Botox and Dysport in my kitchen. Very close friends. But if you are considering injectables, be it toxins or fillers, be safe with your choice. These are medical procedures. They need to be done in the proper environment. Injectables in hair and nail salons just isn’t a great idea. Honestly the chances of immediate problems with an injection is remote, but if, just if, something unexpected occurs, you want to be in the proper venue. Finally, let me comment on the “Botox Parties”. I know plastic surgeons and derms do these but I disagree. Injecting a group of women in someone’s home when there is alcohol involved just isn’t a great idea.

Practitioner: Who are you letting put that needle in your face?? Are they trained? Who oversees them? You need to know this. In a lot of offices the Plastic Surgeon does all of his own injections. That’s ok. A lot have a nurse or a nurse practitioner do their injections. For instance in my office, I do some toxin injections, but my RN, Lyzah, does most of them. But, before she injected anyone, she was trained by me and then 3 company approved trainers for the products. Then she injected me and all of my staff. Then she injected patients with me literally looking over her shoulder. Now she has injected 1000’s of patients and I have yet to see anyone with a problem. So a properly trained non MD injector is perfectly acceptable. But if you encounter an Aesthetician or LPN or Medical Assistant injector, I would be wary.

Lee E Corbett, MD

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon